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Matt Neale

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I'm trying to remove the crankshaft nut so I can chain the timing chain.  I can't shift the bolt.  As the engine is in place I'm just rocking the car back and forth as I try to shift it.

The Haynes manual mentions something about locking tabs but I can't see any and the diagrams seem to be referring to an older model.

How do I lock the engine in order to shift this bolt?

Many thanks

Matt

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Ideally, an impact gun.  However, if you have a decent, well-fitting socket or ring spanner then a decent clout with a big hammer (shock + inertia) often does the trick.  You can even use the starter motor (pad the spanner "landing zone" on the chassis with a chunk of wood) though this carries a substantial risk of collateral damage!

To positively lock the crank with the engine in the car you need to remove the starter motor so you can jam something like a chisel or large screwdriver in the ring-gear.

Nick

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I have often used the socket and long bar method. Looking from the front put the bar on RHS of motor, rest bar on something solid or the ground if the bar is long enough and give the key a quick flick. Works every time for me.  (eek)
Tony.

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Finally shifted it.

I wanted to change the chain to eliminate another possible source of noises from the engine.  The old timing chain looked ok.  I changed it anyway.  The new one looks a little more slack if anything.

I got the old tensioner off ok but I think I butchered the new one trying to get it on.  Do I have to take out the pin?  I hope not as it looks like an impossible job to take out and replace the bottom split pin.  But how to you get the new tensioner on without wrecking it?

Frustrating.  I pushed it back into the garage.  It's a job for next weekend.

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Quoted from Nick Jones
To positively lock the crank with the engine in the car you need to remove the starter motor so you can jam something like a chisel or large screwdriver in the ring-gear.


Many years ago I decided that "jamming a chisel in" was a very bad idea. I took some spare bits of steel and fabricated a locking device that bolts where the starter should go. Easy to use and 100% reliable.

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Quoted from Pete Lewis
   found  one where someone had centre popped the gear  cam face


I'm not quite clear what you mean by this. Every Triumph engine I've ever dismantled had a single centre-punch dimple a quarter inch in from the teeth on one face of the camshaft gear. It's a factory mark, or at least a factory recommended service mark, to indicate correct alignment for resetting when the timing chain is replaced.

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Quoted from Matt Neale
Finally shifted it.

I wanted to change the chain to eliminate another possible source of noises from the engine.  The old timing chain looked ok.  I changed it anyway.  The new one looks a little more slack if anything.

I got the old tensioner off ok but I think I butchered the new one trying to get it on.  Do I have to take out the pin?  I hope not as it looks like an impossible job to take out and replace the bottom split pin.  But how to you get the new tensioner on without wrecking it?

Frustrating.  I pushed it back into the garage.  It's a job for next weekend.


Needle nosed pliers an patience will get the pin out and in again.

To get the cover back, you need to pull the spring flat against the cover wall with a length of stout wire, bent into a square hook.  When its on twist the wire to retract the hook.

John

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Ok.  I've taken out the split pins and I've bought a new tensioner.  I'll fit it this weekend.  I might need some watch making tools.

When I replaced the timing chain I marked up the crankshaft and camshaft sprockets.  I took off the camshaft, replaced the chain and put it back together lining it up with the marks.  All good. When I tightened up the camshaft bolts the camshaft sprocket shifted its position by a few degrees (see rubbish diagram).  Do I need to worry about this before I put it all back together.  Should there be this amount of play between the two sprockets.

Does this made sense??

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Matt, this is where Triumph were clever.
If you have the OE manual it's detailed in there.

Two pairs of holes in the cam sprocket, which are offset to each other   If you turn the sprocket 90 degrees, you can gain or loose half a tooth.
Turn the sprocket over and use the same two holes to get a quarter tooth.
From there turn it 90 degrees to get three quarters.
Each adjustment is just over 2 degrees.

Check by "Equal lift on overlap" on  No.4/6 when No 1 is at TDC on firing stroke.

But be absolutely sure that No.1 is at TDC.  Use a piston stop, rather than estimate where it is while the piston stays still at the tip of its stroke.

John

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