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Crankshaft end-float, am I in the clear?


Nilfisken

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Hi,
yesterday I took the engine (1500) out of the car to prepare for the final part of the full chassis restoration (and body tub welding as it turned out as well...). While it is out have decided to give it some fresh paint and change a few leaking seals. Engine runs great so I am tempted to not open it up more than absolutely necessary to be sure that at least one thing of the car is still working this spring ;)

Today I did a check on the end float since changing thrust washers would be best to do when it is out of the car anyway. I got the float to 0.010". Mr. Haynes says 0.006 to 0.014" but the factory workshop manual says 0.004-0.008". Interestingly enough Haynes use the latter value for the earlier smaller displacement engines. Which one should I trust?

I did check the float using a dial gauge against the crankshaft pulley (base attached to the timing cover). First I pushed the crankshaft back all the way from the front and zeroed the gauge. Then from behind the engine I used a flat prying bar against the end of the crankshaft levered against the engine stand to give it a slow but determined push forward. There is an audible click when it stops in its forward motion but repeated measurements always says 0.010". Is this method accurate enough the measure the condition of the thrust washers?

One more thing. The oil leaks I plan to fix is the sump (easy I guess?) and then maybe the timing chain cover. Is the last one fairly simple to do for someone that never really opened up an engine. Is it also a good idea to take the head off for a general clean up/valve re-lapping or can that be left if the engine works fine in general?

Cheers,
Oskar

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Oskar,
Because the end float is as large as it is you should consider new thrust washers while you have the sump off to reseal it. With the engine out and the sump removed you have done the parts that make thrust washers difficult.
When resealing the sump take the time to make sure the flange of the pan is straight before putting things back together. Time spent with a hammer and block of wood straightening the flange will pay handsomely in leak prevention. The similar flange on the timing cover should receive the same attention.
When assembling be very careful about the proper torque for the screws that go into the aluminium sealing block. They often have been overtightened pulling the threads out of the alloy block.
Without any specific reason to remove the cylinder head you can leave it as it is and save some coin.
                                                                                     Cheers,
                                                                                     Paul

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Hi Paul,
even though I'm a bit scared of engine work I agree with you, it makes sense to deal with it when the sump is of anyway. Am I right that I only have to take the rear cap of and that the crank can stay in the block during the operation? I found this webpage (for a TR6 but similar I guess), does it look accurate enough? http://tr6.danielsonfamily.org/ThrustWashers.htm

Cheers!

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Oskar,
That page seems to cover the thrust washer job nicely.
                                                         Cheers,
                                                         Paul

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  • 3 months later...

Time for an update, today I finally took the sump of to inspect the thrust washers. They look frickin horrible on the soft bearing side, but I cant see or feel any damage to the end of the crankshaft that has been riding against this mess so I think the crank is OK. Now I need to decide what size of thrust washers to order, I cant find my micrometer at the moment but as soon as that is done I will measure them and go for a total of 0.005 over size but does anyone here know what the standard size is? My old ones have no markings saying wether they are standard or oversized so I'm not sure how to know what type to get without that measurement.

Cheers!

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