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Zendervision

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I've installed my new crankshaft, and torqued everything up. I just need to rotate it a touch to get to the last two big ends. So I go to screw the nut on the end (pictured) and it just won't screw on. It's as if it's slightly too small.

Now the confusion: Canley and Rimmer's catalogues say there are two nuts for this job, a larger and a smaller. Presumably I have the smaller and need the larger. But Rimmer's also says there is a different pulley and timing gear to go with the different bolt, but the pulley from my old crank fits perfectly, as does the timing gear.

Am I in need of the larger nut or am I doing something wrong?

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Zendervision wrote:
Okay, I know what's wrong now - it was the right size nut, turns out the thread on my reconditioned crankshaft is damaged. I can't see any obvious damage right now but I'm sure it's fixable.

At least, I hope so. I don't want to have to remove it again  :-/



It's probably slightly crushed/bruised right at the start.  A bit of careful attention with a fine file should sort it.

Nick

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If you are convinced its the very begining of the thread (an if it won't start that's a most likely right), another trick is to just file the first 1/4 to 1/2 turn completely flat, creating a new starting point.  Are you sure the nut is ok?  Do you have another crank you can try it on.

And no, I don't think it is acceptable to receive 're-con' (emphasis on the secon syllable!) stuff that needs rework, but sending it back is a hassle and who knows if the next one is any better.....

Nick

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It was prpbably dropped on its end by the carrier.
Not good news to hear, but out of the control of the supplier, who I suppsoe should be required to take it nup with carrier.
But, it's easy enugh to file the thread on the end of the crank.  Find a fine triangular file - a thread file not necessary.   Run your thumb nail along the thread to find the damaged part, and use the triangular file in the groove of the thread, until you can run the nut up and down it freely.   That end bit of thread is not important anyway - it's not even in contact with the nut when it's done up tight, so precision filing isn't necessary.

Just fettle it away!
John

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I'm going to spend the weekend fettling. I have tried the nut on the old crank and it's fine so some drastic thread-alteration might be necessary. The supplier was helpful and said they'd take it back for examination but I don't want to pay to post the thing unless a replacement is a certainty. Worst comes to the worst, I'll get my old one reground locally and send this one back as the exchange.

The cost per mile of this flaming car must be in three figures by now :P I only did 250 miles before it broke down! Suppose I can write it off as a lesson in mechanics.

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Good news! I managed to recreate the thread with a file. Unfortunately, I've damaged the nut in the process (*rolls eyes*). But I'm pretty happy because this seemed insurmountable this morning.

Last question, I promise: It's a GE short crank engine. The nut is 1 & 7/16ths by my measurement. Is this the one Rimmers call "All 13/60 except late" or "late 13/60"?

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Zendervision wrote:
Last question, I promise: It's a GE short crank engine. The nut is 1 & 7/16ths by my measurement. Is this the one Rimmers call "All 13/60 except late" or "late 13/60"?
Yes. The "late 13/60" would have (I think) a 1 & 13/16" nut.

As for the threads on the crank, I have a set of "thread chasers" I got years ago. They're kinda like nuts only with a "starting area" like a die would have. They seem to do a pretty nice job of repairing this sort of damaged thread.

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