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Waterpump gasket


aar0sc

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Does anyone have a waterpump gasket (ie from block to pump) that they can take a face-on picture of, with a scale visible? (preferably a ruler). Spitfire's pouring water out from the front and I'm not really going to make it back home with no water, I've already overheated twice today!


Cheers, Aaron

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Okay, will do!

It's got hylomar on at the moment (or rather, blue gasketite, but it's the same :P ), but that seems to have blown through, as water just sprays out. Reason I started this is because the old pump sprayed water everywhere and I overheated this morning, changed it (not to easy and everything was stuck) and it's basically the same and overheated outside my mates house :(

Still at mates house :P

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Hi Aaron

Have you tried the cornflake packet trick, it's just like brass rubbing ( that'll set Smithy off) .
Just press the cardboard over the casting to get a impression of the outline then ether cut out with scissors or use the sharp edges of the casting by tapping it with a small hammer, unfortunately it's easier to demonstrate than explain .  

Gordon

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Bill,
You're right. That is pump, housing, and fan all in one, apparently.
Aaron,
To prevent spraying water everywhere loosen the radiator cap. Without pressure there will be much less leakage.
I'm not sure why, but I have always found that used water pumps will leak when put back into service unless they are stored with the impeller and inner seal submerged in coolant.
                                                                                         Cheers,
                                                                                         Paul

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As Paul said, when you've got a leak, like your spraying from a gasket, or a hole in a hose that you've had to repair in an emergency with duct tape, on our cars you can usually make it home or anywhere by making a repair that just holds water, not pressure, & putting the radiator cap on only to the first click.

If you screw the rad cap all the way down, it will pressurize, & you don't need that for this situation.

Broadly, our cars were originally designed to cool with water just circulating though at almost no pressure.  The pressurized later caps just made it possible to suck water back in from the overflow bottle when the engine cooled off, making it unneccessary to top up the water as often.

If you make it just hold water, put the cap on one click, & take a couple of jugs of water just in case, you'll get to wherever & whenever you can make a by-the-book repair.

The cereal box gasket is one I've never heard or thought of, & sounds good.

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If you got gasket material, or just some cardboard, that's the way we make gaskets here.
Just hammer the contours lightly with a hammer until the gasket start marking, you can then either cut it or continue a bit more until it parts.
We normally use old admiralty charts for that, but they might be a bit hard to come by for you land lubbers.

Seen the condition of the hose I would first flush the radiator and block through with a water hose to get most of the debris out.

Dirk

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rotoflex wrote:
It looks like he's taken the water pump housing off, not the water pump from the water pump housing.
Isn't that the water pump housing beneath the fan on his tire?



True, I couldn't separate the pump itself from either one of my housings, so decided to swap the whole thing.

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Mark, I also suspect that pump's no good.   :-/
I'm not set off by brass rubbing Gords, but chrome polishing gives me a big smile. :)
New pump and gasket's £30. There y'are then. Best clean the surface up niceley with a nice sharp blade and a bit of spit.

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smithy wrote:
Mark, I also suspect that pump's no good.   :-/
I'm not set off by brass rubbing Gords, but chrome polishing gives me a big smile. :)
New pump and gasket's £30. There y'are then. Best clean the surface up niceley with a nice sharp blade and a bit of spit.


I'm not buying a new pump, I've got two spare ones and therefore don't need a new one!

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Fair enough! I reckon if you put 'em on without giving her a flush though, ooooer missus, and the vanes keep getting choked up with poop, you'll need a new one soon enough though matey!
I'm very rich indeed and think nothing of spending that kind of money on keeping my car cool though, I readily acknowledge. I don't use no second-hand brakes either, so there.  ;)

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If it's the pump, you'll have to separate the pump from the housing now.
Unless you're sure the leak was between the housing & the engine.

At any rate, you need:
(1) gasket between housing & engine
If replacing the pump, the gasket is usually included (check to make sure!)

You'll need to ask the other Spitfireans for advice on separating the water pump from the housing.

I can see though how it could possibly be just the silicone goo seal that you'd made before, if the recent progression was:  silicone goo seal->heater hose stopped up->pressure pops out place of lowest resistance, that being the silicone goo seal.  You're the one who saw the leak & will best be able to decide.  The water pump will leak on the front of the housing, but a leak behind the housing would have been the goo seal.

Used water pumps are items that don't store well.  Water pumps that were fine on cars that aren't run for several months very often will leak badly when started up again.  They don't like being not run.

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I'll add that i have had very little success with using "used" pumps, they rarely last very long at all. I suspect they get corroded internally, and that damages the seals when you start  to use them again. Ho hum.

But do give them a go, just don't expect too much.

And well worth giving it a decent flush out, lots of crud about. I suspect the blocked hose contributed to the overheating somewhat. But would have thought the rad cap would have let go before the gaskets? Oh, and worth carrying an unopened tube of silicone instant gasket in the car, along with the gaffa tape, superglue and cable ties.

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Bill, Clive, sound stuff. Poor Aaron, I'm trying to patronise him on two different threads!
This picture should be over here too I think, it's awesome.

I now remember A the I flushing his block when he changed lumps, and he's also mentioned his radiator running clear, so gawd knows where that lot came from. It looks like one of those "You will get arterial clogging and coronary thrombosis if you continue to smoke" pictures.
Maybe he's got one of those special self-lightening engine blocks that the racing boys have been on about lately, that spontaneously shed material.  :-/

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Besides, Aaron's description of what happened:

Quote:
praying as I went up their road for the gauge to recede and as I got onto their drive something blew and sprayed steam and water everywhere

doesn't read like a water pump leak.  That's pressure blowing stuff out.

Go with what you suspected, make a cereal box gasket between the housing & engine, & put the radiator cap on one click.
If the water pump leaks, you're only out a cereal box so far.
If it's going to leak, you'll see it leaking from the pump while it's idling in the driveway.

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After that trip to my mate's house it was leaking a lot at idle, coming out of the block/waterpump housing join, trickling along to an engine mount then being blown away by the fan. Here's where the original pump was leaking from:


And here's the "new" pump in:


Chris I would be rather interested, especially now that I can actually send cheques! (Only taken two months, cheers bank :P ).

Aa

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Excellent!  Is it holding water even with the radiator cap screwed all the way down?

It would likely be a good idea to take the previous advice & give the car a good flush daily for the next couple of days.
I wonder if all the coagulating junk came from the water pump, housing, & steel pipe you later swapped on.
At any rate, it would be good to keep after that stuff for a couple of days until certain it's stopped dumping rust into the cooling system.

Also, it would be a good idea to start work on one of your spare water pump/housing assemblies to separate the water pump so you won't be caught if/when the current water pump expires & must be replaced.  Soaking it with penetrating oil, banging it, & giving it moderate effort once a day for a week would be a good start, but if that doesn't get things moving, you'll need to take it someplace where they've got a torch & can heat up the fasteners to loosen & remove them.  You don't want to break them.  It's the sort of thing a shop might do for a quick ten or 20 bucks or even free if you're lucky.

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rotoflex wrote:
Excellent!  Is it holding water even with the radiator cap screwed all the way down?

It would likely be a good idea to take the previous advice & give the car a good flush daily for the next couple of days.
I wonder if all the coagulating junk came from the water pump, housing, & steel pipe you later swapped on.
At any rate, it would be good to keep after that stuff for a couple of days until certain it's stopped dumping rust into the cooling system.

Also, it would be a good idea to start work on one of your spare water pump/housing assemblies to separate the water pump so you won't be caught if/when the current water pump expires & must be replaced.  Soaking it with penetrating oil, banging it, & giving it moderate effort once a day for a week would be a good start, but if that doesn't get things moving, you'll need to take it someplace where they've got a torch & can heat up the fasteners to loosen & remove them.  You don't want to break them.  It's the sort of thing a shop might do for a quick ten or 20 bucks or even free if you're lucky.


Yes it is, first short drive was with it on one click, next with it all the way down, needle solid at just under middle :)

The crap was in the old pump's pipe, although I'll flush it again, I connected it to a hose coming from the kitchen tap (and therefore not a hosepipe, right?) and forced water through the manifold and the heater :)

I shall give that a go :)

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