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Should I Rebuild My Engine?


Anthony

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Or, to be more precise - When should I rebuild my engine?

I'm part way through a chassis up restoration

I've down to the bare chassis right now, and will hopefully get started on the rebuild in the coming months

I know at some point I'm going to want to rebuild my engine - But do you think I should do it now or later?

I know for ease I should do it now, but I'm also very keen to get it back on the road

Various events have meant my car has been off the road for 12 years

So, should I rebuild it now and do it all before the body goes back on the chassis, or would you just get it back on the road and sort the engine later on?

I'm planning on a show car quality finish if that has any bearing, and I hadn't planned to rebuild the gearbox at all

I wouldn't be rebuilding the engine to increase power at all, just to grind the valves, change the rings,  and lighten and balance the rotating mass in order to improve efficiency and reduce stresses


So, with the above info in mind, what would you suggest I do?

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1903 wrote:

I wouldn't be rebuilding the engine to increase power at all, just to grind the valves, change the rings,  and lighten and balance the rotating mass in order to improve efficiency and reduce stresses



If that’s all you want to get done then I would say do it now  :) It will be worthwhile doing whole lot one go while your car is not in a running condition. Otherwise you will have it off the road again..

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Indeed. I would do a compression check, and if that all seems OK, just whip the sump off (be amazed at the inch of crud in the bottom) and have a look at all the bearings. This can be done without taking the crank out, although number 1 main requires the bridge piece to be removed, Can be done without taking off the front plate with a little ingenuity and thought. If in doubt spend £60 on new shells and thrusts. Check the oil pump, maybe a few minutes working on the tolerances, and put the clean sump back on. The cranks are where these engines can suffer badly, and while the engine is out isn't a long job or difficult.

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We plan to do the same with the MK3 engine. I have an engine stand like this I bought years ago

http://www.machinemart.co.uk/images/library/product/large/02/020110455.jpg?2

Is it OK to fasten a Spitfire engine to it to work on, anyone used one ?

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MK3,

I also have one of these, and whilst I normally use it to hold a gearbox (I also have a more substantial looking stand for engines), it should be fine for a four cylinder engine.
I've just hung my spare GT6 engine off it, purely to get it off the floor, and it seems to be holding up okay (although it's a beggar to rotate), although admittedly that is just the block and crank, no head or pistons - that said, I reckon that still weighs more than a full Spit engine.

Neil

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Thanks np, I bought it a few years ago to sling a really heavy 4cyl engine on then changed my mind. Now we have the Spit, its only a small block, so hopefully it should be able to carry it. But the idea of holding it with just those 4 bolts ........  (pray)

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I know.

If it makes you feel better, I have a fully loaded GT6 lump hanging off my other stand - incl head, rockers, exhaust manifold and all anciliarys - it's the same four bolts, and it seems fine. The trick seems to be getting the right combination of washers (large and thick) to spread the load - once I used one that were too thin, and they look decidedly domed now.

I still keep toes out from directly underneath, just in case - the trouble with the smaller stand (like yours) is that the T shaped frame makes it easy to forget and put your feet under the engine - the larger ones have two "legs", and it's just a case of not stepping inside these.

These ones are perfect for gearboxes though - that's why I kept hold of mine when I got the bigger one - they are much more mobile and don't take up too much space - which really is the critical point for me, my single garage is something of a Tardis already!

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Thinking about it a little more, I'd most likely want to do the following...........

Lighten & balance rotating mass, etc
Bearings
Piston rings
Cam followers
Duplex timing gear
Clutch
Oil pump
Water pump
Rear seal
Lap valves

One small detail I forgot - the car is still non overdrive

Ill be adding OD when I find a good box

So, does that make the decision easier?

Should I do the engine and gearbox at the same time, regardless of whether that's before or after the car is back on the road?

Thanks again guys

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