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What Miles per Gallon Do You Expect on the RBRR


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After looking through the receipts and working it out it looks as though the pi returned 31.6 mpg. I know a lot of the run was cruising as the weather in places dictated that high speed stuff was out. I have never actually had reason before now to work out the fuel consumption but I guess this is ok?  

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I worked out that we got an average of 39.76 miles per gallon in a 1500 Spitfire, which is much better than the 35 mpg I was expecting.

All in, we did 2,768 miles from door to door.

We used 65.63 gallons (nearly all super unleaded) at a cost of £468.14 with an average cost of £1.56.5 a litre.

And worth every damned penny purely for the experience.

Jim.

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My first couple of RBRR's were done with John Kipping in his Herald 1500 'Turn Left For Tangier' replica I built for him. On our first outing the car was still fresh out of restoration, and we were still tinkering with its induction. Initially it was twin HS4's, but JK was obsessed with fuel economy, and we quickly realised after a couple of rolling road sessions that they weren't cutting the mustard. Just prior to the event we fitted a pair of 150 Strombergs for there more refined control. These proved better, and I recall high 30's mpg overall.

With the benefit of a couple of years twiddling, and our epic East African adventure we went into our second RBRR with our ultimate set up of a single HS6 on a bored out Dolomite 1500 inlet manifold. The rest of the engine consisted of Pony 1500 lightweight crank, Spitfire MKIII profile cam, tubular manifold into Vitesse MKII exhaust. In that form JK recorded the economy figures of each section as being never less than 40mpg, but usually in the mid 40's, and on a couple of sections (when he was driving!) in the low 50's mpg.

Scroll forward a few decades, and James, and myself have yet to work up the courage to tot up the mpg of our Kastner engined  Weber equipped GT6. I would be happy if it was North of 20 mpg, but I fear it will prove to be less.

However the girls in the Courier (similar spec to JK's Herald other than it has 2.5 bore, and stroke, and therefore 1660 cc) were surprised when we kept darting into fuel stations, and they were still showing a nearly full tank. In fact I have been driving the Courier all week on its left over RBRR fuel, and it looks like I might get at least another week out of it.  

Picture of JK's Herald at Lands End on our first RBRR. You can tell how long ago it was by the fact it's in black, and white, and taken on a box browny camera.

   

herald1500.jpg

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The easing of the fuel supply situation enabled me to top up the TR's tank yesterday for the first time since Ashburton and work out a true overall consumption for the event of 36.38mpg, the best I have ever achieved. 

Tim

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11 hours ago, thescrapman said:

A light right foot this time round, knowing it's could have been the most expensive ever?

I wasn't conscious of easing off. Indeed there were stretches where I (or my brother) drove quite enthusiastically. There was, however, somewhat less traffic than in some recent years, and I wonder whether the consequent lack of stop-start, slow moving, or need for aggressive overtaking may have contributed to some of the very good figures we've seen reported.

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In my Stag, we achieved an average of 30.6mpg overall, with between 32 and 33mpg on the motorway sections. I am happy with that as we also had lots of "smiles per mile thrown in"😄. We managed to find E5 every time we tanked up for fuel.

Bruce

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On 14/10/2021 at 22:14, thescrapman said:

A light right foot this time round, knowing it's could have been the most expensive ever?

Yes Colin, in view of possible fuel availability issues Mike and I treated the event as an econonmy run this time. We could see little point in arriving at controls before they opened and spent most time on motorways and dual carriageways between 2,500 and 2,800rpm in o/d top. However, we had some fun on roads in the Highlands and Wales and were not averse to using the car's full performance when appropriate for overtakes. The absence of hold ups helped economy as well, I have no mechanical fan on the 4A, the temperature gauge barely reached half way and the Kenlowe did not cut in once during the whole run. I forgot to partially blank off the radiator before leaving home, if the enbgine had been running hotter I might have achieved even better econonmy.

Tim

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We done the C2C but didn't check the economy but on our 1st RBRR we averaged 35.4mpg in a 1500 Spitfire with no overdrive.

My mate drove the car carefully and I was pushing it, so may have got a little bit more driving conservatively. 

I changed the jets on my SU's before the RBRR and got the carbs balanced professionally.  I think this helped the most.

RBRR 2021 - Lands End 2.jpg

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