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Do New trunnion's leak oil? - solution is?


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My spit mk2 has a trunnion with 2mm vertical/lateral wobble -I suspect this is to much can anybody confirm?

However the American triumph forum mentions the new trunnions (that have been cheapened up with a 2 part assembly differing from original )  leak oil out the disc seal on the bottom and or they blow out when oiling up  and need epoxy sealing before first use -this is a disgrace on a highly critical component 

So anybody here in UK finding same problem? I presume all UK suppliers have the same sub standard trunnions for sale?

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The actual trunnion is the brass? bottom section (never heard of it being two parts?) is just one piece. The other section above this, is the vertical link that threads into the trunnion as the steering is turned (or something like that).

I did epoxy my replacement (in case it leaked). Some folk solder them, I think.

Yes, many repro parts are sub standard (though often, relatively very cheap) and is often a right pain.

Cheers, Dave

 

 

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Ah thanks Dave , yes the brass item,

Most photos of new brass trunnions conveniently  don't show the offending alteration but according to American forum the new ones are bored all way through and a thin steel blanking disc factory pressed in at bottom of trunnion to seal the bore hole. I presume you mean you epoxied the blanking  disc in as per the American forums. 

So have you lubed the trunnion with oil via the grease port and your blanking disc did not blow out so it was a success? 

I was toying with soft soldering in the disc as you mention but wanna be super careful with stressing such a critical component.

 

so people here too are epoxy in and soldering. 

I presume your epoxy workied

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if they are like the trunions on the TR6 and GT6, i believe they all had a crimprd bottom disc. I understand rhat some aftermarket parts are prone to leaking.  Solder is a good fix.

Edspacer.png

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I wonder how this sort off substandard part occurs, is it because :

1)part manf renegades on spec for part to maximise profit

2) part suppliers don't want to stump up full cost of original spec part to minimise cost of part inventory stock and design/request redesign to cheapen up

3) Supplier thinks customers won't pay for original spec part so redesigns a cheaper solution

personally I suspect no. 2 - As I wonder how many of these parts for small triumphs are being shifted these days and I don't think MOTS would pick up on worn trunnions (mine wasn't! ) so there's probably lots of blissfully unaware owners out there ..and lots of trunnions sitting on the shelves gathering dust which the supplier wants to tie the minimum amount of money up in.

 

 

 

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How much does the bottom of your wheel move when jacked up off the ground? Is it possible that the vertical link thread isnt engaged in the trunnion as much as possible? Unfortunately to check this youve got to undo the bottom bolt which can be rusted into its bush however that    has be done to replace the trunnion anyway...

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Epoxy still ok after 7 years.

The oil normally exits from the seal at the top of the V.L when full.

Myself and a fair few others have dicarded the often leacky/messy grease guns and simply removed the grease nipple/blanking screw and used a pump/trigger oil can (some have used a syringe apparently). Jack the front end up to ease the suspension load. Also if the top seals are new or very good, then a loly stick etc, pushed up the side of the seal, opens it up a bit and allows the oil to flow more freely through the trunnion.

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Posted (edited)

If it is like the trunnions on the GT6 or TR6, they have a crimped in steel disc at the bottom.  If they leak, soldering is a very good way to seal them. 

Ed

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Edited by Ed H
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And I wouldnt complain about sub standard bits too much. We're lucky to get these bits at all!

If they have to make them slightly different from original its better than for some other makes of classic cars where the bits are unobtainable. How many of those trunnions do you think they sell in a year nowadays and still the price is reasonable - imagine the equivalent bit for a classic Ferrari🤪

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I really wish we had clauses like in the US and UK in Germany that a car after a certain age does not require too much scrutiny at the MOT (or equivalent).

Technically, if you don't replace a part with original, OEM or replica part you car is not allowed on the road (mildly oversimplified/exaggerated).

If you do modify a car the TÜV (MOT) engineer has to "test" and certify it.

I have spoken to nearly a dozen of them and like anything else, they all have fairly differing opinions.

One guy even claimed he would not certify anything that had not run for at least 10000 km on the Nürnburgring!  Others were more forthcoming... but it is a long, boring and frustrating process.

The thing is, once something passes, just like your driver's license, it is valid forever.

Problem is the parts are so niche I doubt anyone would go through the expense... It also seems to be a very German (and partially Austrian) problem.

Part of me was thinking maybe there would be a legal way to get a car registered in say, Luxembourg but I haven't gone down that path much.

I have written to a few suppliers in the UK asking if they would like help in getting TÜV approval but none have responded so far...

My fear is that these cars may die if we can't find some sort of compromise.

There is a group here fighting for recognition of "rolling motorized heritage" to try to get exemptions but most of them are purists and by nature against using non-standard parts...

*sigh*...

 

 

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Yes we are lucky in this respect in the UK and all I can think is that theres some very highly placed politicians who are into classic/vintage cars (and Im only half joking here!) which makes them sympathetic to the issue...

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On 27/05/2021 at 17:10, glang said:

Yes we are lucky in this respect in the UK and all I can think is that theres some very highly placed politicians who are into classic/vintage cars (and Im only half joking here!) which makes them sympathetic to the issue...

I think that's a lot do do with it.

I epoxied from the out side.  Easier, and no possible reaction?, from the oil.

Have found some stuff, doesn't hold up like it used to, Contact adhesive and liquid metal epoxy springs to mind.

Dave

 

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My 2p's worth...

1) Expensive option: Just go trunnionless

2) Controversial option: Use Land Rover "1-shot" swivel housing grease. It's a special grease formulated to replace EP90 in Series/Defender swivel housings.

I used option 2 for years before I invested in the trunnionless kit.

 

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, Dave Clasper said:

Does that mean it never degrades/goes hard?

I believe that's the theory. I never had any issues with it and the threads on the trunnions and uprights were fine when I replaced them - I just wanted the peace of mind of the trunnionless for the 10CR

The one-shot grease is described as:
STC3435
One shot gives ‘filled for life’ protection
> Formulated for all leaf & coil spring Land Rover, Discovery and Range Rover models - 1951 - to date.
> Lubricates swivel pins and housing seals, protects spheres.
> A semi-fluid grease designed to withstand shock loading in oscillating joints.
> Reinforced with solid lubricants, highly resistant to water and salt corrosion.
> Better lubrication while driving, less leaks while standing.
> One shot gives ‘filled for life’ protection.

Land Rover originally specified ep90 for the swivels and it was "superceded" by this stuff.

 

Edited by yorkshire_spam
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  • 2 weeks later...

The solder technique seems the best my only worry is heating up the part and weakening it. I've now inspected my trunnion and links ,both trunnions are manf type with steel disc on bottom stamped L or R they don't leak ,  I dont think they are OEM parts

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