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67 Mk1 GT6 restoration


byakk0
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It's basically a straight swap on the front hubs - on the rear hubs rather than remove the hub I drilled an approx. .5" hole in the backplate in line to slide a stud through, then rotates the hub for the next etc. A bit of overkill but I also used Loctie, put the wheel on and tightened to get them well seated.  The used a rubber grommet to seal the hole - job done.  

http://auskellian.com/paul/links_files/upgrade_spitfire_wheel_studs.html

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Spent the day cleaning and painting the driver's side rear axel today. Got it looking real nice as compared to earlier in the day, and quite possibly ever. Still need to work on the vertical link, but that will come.





I've had the drums soaking in vinegar for a week, and after a good hosing, they brushed off easily. High temp paint, and here you go.
(I masked off the interior of the drum with tape and hit the bare metal afterwards with por-15 metal ready to keep them from rusting.)




So, a few weeks ago I received a shipment of new brake parts from spitbits, and tonight I started putting them back on. I got as far as the brake adjuster (I refurbished old one as it only needed cleaning) and when I went to install the new wheel cylinder I realized I neglected 2 things. First, (the second wouldn't matter if I hadn't forgot this one) I did not order a new hand-brake lever (the L arm that connects the brake cylinder to the handbrake cable.
Second, I did not clean up the old handbrake lever.

So, trying to assemble them tonight I discovered I could go no further than the brake adjuster.

Then I turn my attention to my new studs...and it turns out I bought ones that have a shank too small.
I'm sorta stuck as to what I can put in there as my wheel adapters have certain limitations, such as length, and size of the nut.
Guess it's back to the drawing board there, or maybe I will have to order OEM lugs. Hmmm... I'll get back with you.

So...I had to put the shop away as it is nearly 1 AM and I don't think anyone would appreciate me running my angle grinder with a wire brush to clean up that lever.

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Okay...hub update.
I found some studs that work for me, but in the mean time I discovered the holes in one hub are too large. Perhaps the PO drilled em out for some reason?
The normal size holes are 0.460", but the larger ones are 0.590". Shown with a potential donor hub. Now to just remove them (I have a puller from Canley )
Go figure.





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Hi Hazen,
you mounted the brake shoes not correctly. On the picture (top pic of the last three pics) where you see the three brake assemlies / halfshafts, the left pic shoes your reconditioned brakes. The mid brake assembly shows the correct mounting of the shoes.
Guess why I know ....
Cheers
Martin

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I'd say that you need a sleeve for those overlarge holes, then tack weld the bolt heads to the back of the hub.
Tacks will be under no strain in use - they just stop the bolts falling back out when the wheels are off and keep them from turning when you put the nuts on.  
John

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John,  I'm contemplating doing something like that if I don't use another hub.

Martin,  yeah,  I know about the backward shoe.  Just haven't fixed it yet. Copied the other side but missed that somehow.  All part of the learning curve.

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Just a quick note. Got the replacement trunnion in the mail today from The Roadster Factory. No time do anything with it other than verify it is for the correct side this time. I do have to say, it is nice that they are servicing an order that is nearly 19 years old!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Okay, update time...it's been a few weeks and everyone's been wondering. Not a lot has happened, really. Been unable to get more than just a few seconds here or there to do any sort of work.

Got the passenger side rear axle refurbished and reassembled with all new brake parts. I opted not to do the wheel bearings at this time as I will assess their true nature later. As folks on the triumph experience have informed me, why pull the hub apart if it is not necessary? Well, at this point if I can put something off till alter, I will if that gets me closer to a completed car. I'm going to have to swap hub on the driver's side, however, as the hub holes for the studs are nearly 1000th of inch too large.

Front side axle is completed as well, got the replacement trunnion from Good ol Albert at the Roadster Factory this week. I was shipped two left side trunnions in the front-end kit I bought some time ago.

Still need to get the old bushings pressed out of the leaf spring and radius arms and swapped for the new ones-I don't dare use the old as the rubber is half separated. Connecting with my friend who has a press has proven to be difficult.






(ignore the leaf spring-I know its missing 2 leafs-its a temporary spring while I get the other one ready)

All in all it's slowly starting to come together for me. Once I get the drivers side rear axle rebuilt I can run the new tubing and brake cable (new too) and get the tub set back down on the chassis.

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Okay, update time...it's been a few weeks and everyone's been wondering. Not a lot has happened, really. Been unable to get more than just a few seconds here or there to do any sort of work.

Got the passenger side rear axle refurbished and reassembled with all new brake parts. I opted not to do the wheel bearings at this time as I will assess their true nature later. As folks on the triumph experience have informed me, why pull the hub apart if it is not necessary? Well, at this point if I can put something off till alter, I will if that gets me closer to a completed car. I'm going to have to swap hub on the driver's side, however, as the hub holes for the studs are nearly 1000th of inch too large.

Front side axle is completed as well, with the replacement trunnion it was a snap. I was shipped two left side trunnions in the front-end kit I bought some time ago. New rotor and bearings too. The caliper needs rebuilt, and I need new hoses, but those will have to come later, as budget allows. At least they are not critical components at this stage in the game.

Still need to get the old bushings pressed out of the leaf spring and radius arms and swapped for the new ones-I don't dare use the old as the rubber is half separated. Connecting with my friend who has a press has proven to be difficult.






(ignore the leaf spring-I know its missing 2 leafs-its a temporary spring while I get the other one ready)

All in all it's slowly starting to come together for me. Once I get the drivers side rear axle rebuilt I can run the new tubing and brake cable (new too) and get the tub set back down on the chassis.

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Smart move to put the handbrake  cable in at this stage, before replacing the tub. Ask me how I know..

But jumping back to the rear stud replacement, I found that the Freelander ones I got were, even when chamfered to seat fully in the hub, just flicking the rubber seal on the slave cylinder, just enough to ensure it would wear and probably fail in a short time.  I had to pull the hubs off yet again to grind the heads back a little, to match the angle of the hub corners.  Humbly suggest you double-check yours?  Maybe just me, I noted that Freelander studs vary in shape even within the same part number from the same supplier.  Again, ask me how I know.

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I don't think my new studs are hitting anything but I will have a look. Thanks for the heads up.
As for the brake cable, I plan on getting that ran before remating the tub-along with the fuel and brake lines.

I've made plenty of mistakes other folks, including myself, can learn from, so I know what you mean! Additionally, I read a lot of rebuilds and pick up on other folks mistakes best avoided too.

With any luck I can get the hubs swapped this week on the drivers side, perhaps even get it all rebuilt, painted, and installed--but I think that is asking a lot of myself right now. (well, actually that is hoping the missus will allow me sufficient playtime in the garage )

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Still need to check the stud clearances....

Anyway, here goes another round of updates for you.

Got the bushings on the radius arms and the leaf spring finally swapped. Had a visit with a friend who owns a hydraulic press. Smacking those with a hammer just doesn't do a lot.


Also, When I tore apart the spring for refurbishing I found some goofy straps holding the spring together. They were made of thin metal, probably 22 gauge or thereabouts, and I had to bend a tab on each side straight to release them. Most clamps I've seen are about 3/16" thick and have a bolt and spacer across the bottom. Add to that, there were only 3 straps on mine instead of 4.
You know how metal is when you start bending it, and I was worried if I re-used the clamps, the bending the tabs back would fatigue the metal enough to cause failure at some point in the future, so I did not want to do that. My only other option was replacing the straps, which I have not seen on any parts lists or break-down diagrams, so I would have to make my own.
But, the good news is I have a few other sets of leaf springs, so I took the the two leaves from another that has the proper clamps.
Thursday I reassembled the spring...or at least I tried to. I discovered the clamps I added were too short, partly because I put in new spacers, but also because I failed to count the number of leaves on the donor spring and the one I was using. My spring has 10, the donor only had 8 ( I think--still haven't counted that one).
So...the problem at hand was dealing with short clamps, and the question: Extend the clamps or build new ones?
I could have sliced the clamps and added a new piece of metal, or just add a piece and drill a new hole, but I realized that would be probably more labor intensive than build new ones entirely. I did have strips of 3/16" steel, after all.
So, after a bit of cutting and drilling, I was able to fashion some new clamps.
I used stainless steel bolts and nuts to finish them off.

One bent and one in progress


All 4 completed


I ground the rivet head off of the clamps to remove them from the spring, and ground the remaining post smaller to fit through the hole I drilled in the top of the new clamps, then welded them in place and finished the weld off to give the appearance of a rivet head.

All together. (sorry they are blurry. I'll get some better ones. I shot these at night with my tablet, using the headlights of my car for light)



I still have to get it installed, but I am further along at least!

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Yep. Time...time...time...Never enough. The new baby certainly keeps me busy!

Glad I am able to build some of the needed items. It may seem like one step forward and two back at times, but at least I can build something on the spot instead of having to wait weeks for an expensive replacement part.

She's up to 10 pounds and worth every minute.

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Well, I got the refurbished spring installed today...finally.


I also started trying to remove the rear driver's side hub...and promptly bent it. Good thing I have spares. So, I guess It is off to find a friend with an impact wrench.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • Ben Hutchings changed the title to 67 GT6 Mk1 Restoration - New

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